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442 CANNED FRU1 TS.

CANNED PLUMS.

To EVERY pound of plums allow a quarter of a pound of sugar. Put the sugar and plums alternately into the preserving kettle, first prick- ing the plums to prevent their breaking. Let them stand on the back of the stove for an hour or two, then put them over a moderate fire and allow to come to a boil; skim and pour at once into jars, running a sil- ver spoon handle around the inside of the jar to break the air-bubbles ;

cover and screw down the tops.


CANNED MINCE MEAT.

MINCE MEAT for pies can be preserved for years if canned the same as fruit while hot, and put into glass jars and sealed perfectly tight, and set in a cool, dark place. One glass quart jar will hold enough to make two ordinary-sized pies, and in this way "mince pies" can be had in the middle of summer as well as in winter, and if the cans are sealed properly, the meat will be just as fine when opened as when first canned.

CANNED BOILED CIDER.

BOILED cider, in our grandmothers' time, was indispensable to the making of a good "mince pie," adding the proper flavor and richness, which cannot be substituted by any other ingredient, and a gill of which being added to a rule of "fruit cake" makes it more moist, keeps longer, and is far superior to fruit cake made without it. Boiled cider is an article rarely found in the market, now-a-days, but can be made by any one, with but little trouble and expense, using sweet cider, shortly after it is made, and before fermentation takes place. Place five quarts of sweet cider in a porcelain-lined kettle over the fire, boil it slowly until reduced to one quart, carefully watch- ing it that it does not burn ; turn into glass jars while hot and seal tightly, the same as canned fruit. It is then ready to use any time of the year.

CANNED PUMPKIN.

PUMPKINS or squash canned are far more convenient for ready use than those dried in the old-fashioned way.

Cut up pumpkin or squash into small pieces, first cutting off the peel; stew them until tender, add no seasoning; then mash them very ne with a potato masher. Have ready your cans, made hot, and then

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