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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 3.djvu/132

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PARISINA.

THE GIAOUR.

The Bat builds in his Haram bower,' And in the fortress of his power The Owl usurps the beacon-tower ; The wild-dog howls o'er the fountain's brim, With baffled thirst, and famine, grim; For the stream has shrunk from its marble bed, Where the weeds and the desolate dust are spread. 'Twas sweet of yore to see it play And chase the sultriness of day, 300 As springing high the silver dew '• In whirls fantastically flew. The Bat hath built in his mothe7-s boiver, And in the fortress 0/ his power The Owl hath fixed her beacoft tower, The wild dogs howl Ofi thefoufitain^s brim With baffled thirst and famine grifn. For the stream is shrunk f-om its marble bed Where Desolation^ s dust is spread. — MS.^ B. [" August 5, 1813, in last of -^^ or first of 4**' ed."] The lofiely Spider's thin grey pall Is curtai7ied o'er the splendid wall — The Bat builds ifi his mother's boxver ; And in the fortress of his power The Owl hath fixed her beacofi-tower^ The zvild dog howls o'er the fountaifi' s brink. But vainly lolls his tongue to drink. — [MS.] i. The silver dew of coldness sprinkling In drops fantastically twinkling As from the spring the silver dew In whirls fantastically flew.

A?id dashed luxurious coolness round The air — and vei'dure on the ground. — [MS.^ I. [C oni pare "The walls of Balclutha were desolated. . . . The stream of Clutlia was removed from its place by the fall of the walls. The fox looked out from the windows " (Ossian's Balclutha). " The dreary night-owl screams in the solitary retreat of his mouldering ivy-covered tower " [Larnul, or the Song of Despair : Poems of Ossian, discovered by the Baron de Harold, 1787, p. 172). Com- pare, too, the well-known lines, "The spider holds the veil in the palace of Csesar ; the owl stands sentinel on the watch-tower of Afrasyab" {A Grammar oj the Persian Language, by Sir W. Jones, 1809, p. 106). See, too, Gibbon's Decline and Fall, 1826, iii. 378.]