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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 7.djvu/110

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76
JEUX D'ESPRIT AND MINOR POEMS, 1798-1824.

JOHN KEATS.[1]

Who killed John Keats?
"I," says the Quarterly,
So savage and Tartarly;
"'T was one of my feats."


Who shot the arrow?
"The poet-priest Milman
(So ready to kill man)
"Or Southey, or Barrow."

July 30, 1821.
[First published, Letters and Journals, 1830, ii. 506.]


FROM THE FRENCH.

Ægle, beauty and poet, has two little crimes;
She makes her own face, and does not make her rhymes.

Aug. 2, 1821.
[First published, The Liberal, 1823, No. II. p. 396.]


TO MR. MURRAY.

1.

For Orford[2] and for Waldegrave[3]
You give much more than me you gave;
Which is not fairly to behave,
My Murray!


  1. [For Croker's "article" on Keats's Endymion (Quarterly Review, April, 1818, vol. xix. pp. 204-208), see Don Juan, Canto XI. stanza lx. line 1, Poetical Works, 1902, vi. 445, note 4.]
  2. [Horace Walpole's Memoirs of the Last Nine Years of the Reign of George II.]
  3. [Memoirs by James Earl Waldegrave, Governor of George III. when Prince of Wales.]