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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 7.djvu/41

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13
AN ODE TO THE FRAMERS OF THE FRAME BILL.

That she'd discard her fav'rite owl,
And take for pet a brother fowl,
Sagacious R. C. Dallas.

[First published, Life, Writings, Opinions, etc., 1825, ii. 192.]


AN ODE[1] TO THE FRAMERS OF THE FRAME BILL.[2]

1.

Oh well done Lord E——n! and better done R——r![3]
Britannia must prosper with councils like yours;
Hawkesbury, Harrowby, help you to guide her,
Whose remedy only must kill ere it cures:
Those villains; the Weavers, are all grown refractory,
Asking some succour for Charity's sake—
So hang them in clusters round each Manufactory,
That will at once put an end to mistake.[4]


  1. ["Lord Byron to Editor of the Morning Chronicle.

    "Sir,—I take the liberty of sending an alteration of the two last lines of stanza 2d., which I wish to run as follows:—

    "'Gibbets on Sherwood will heighten the scenery,
    Shewing how commerce, how liberty thrives.'

    I wish you could insert it tomorrow for a particular reason; but I feel much obliged by your inserting it at all. Of course do not put my name to the thing—believe me,

    "Your obliged
    and very obedient servant,
    "Byron.

    "8, St. James's Street,
    Sunday, March 1, 1812."]

  2. [For Byron's maiden speech in the House of Lords, February 27, 1812, see Letters, 1898, ii. 424-430.]
  3. [Richard Ryder (1 766-1832), second son of the first Baron Harrowby, was Home Secretary, 1809-12.]
  4. Lord E., on Thursday night, said the riots at Nottingham arose from a "mistake."