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Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 7.djvu/79

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45
QUEM DEUS VULT PERDERE PRIUS DEMENTAT.

VERSICLES.

I read the "Christabel;"[1]
Very well:
I read the "Missionary;"[2]
Pretty—very:
I tried at "Ilderim;"
Ahem!
I read a sheet of "Marg'ret of Anjou;"
Can you?
I turned a page of Webster's "Waterloo;"[3]
Pooh! pooh!
I looked at Wordsworth's milk-white "Rylstone Doe;"[4]
Hillo!
I read "Glenarvon," too, by Caro Lamb;[5]
God damn!

March 25, 1817.
[First published, Letters and Journals, 1830, ii. 87.]


QUEM DEUS VULT PERDERE PRIUS DEMENTAT.[6]

God maddens him whom 't is his will to lose,
And gives the choice of death or phrenzy—choose.

[First published, Letters, 1900, iv. 93.]

  1. [Christabel, etc., by S. T. Coleridge, 1816.]
  2. [The Missionary of the Andes, a Poem, by W. L. Bowles, 1815.]
  3. [Waterloo and other Poems, by J. Wedderburn Webster, 1816.]
  4. [The White Doe of Rylstone, or the Fate of the Nortons, a Poem, by W. Wordsworth, 1815.]
  5. [Glenarvon, a Novel [by Lady Caroline Lamb], 1816.]
  6. [À propos of Maturin's tragedy, Manuel (vide post, p. 48, note 1), Byron "does into English" the Latin proverb by way of contrast to the text, "Whom the Lord loveth He chasteneth; blessed be the Name of the Lord" (Letter to Murray, April 2, 1817).]