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Page:The dainty sweet book, from the International cooking library (1903).djvu/24

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WORLD FAMOUS CHEFS

scorch. Take off fire and add half a vanilla bean. Then add slowly one gallon brandy, when cold pour over the cherries. Seal well and keep in a cool place.

PRESERVED CHERRIES

To each pound of stoned cherries allow one pound of granulated cane sugar, crack some of the stones and tie the kernels in a piece of gauze to be removed after the boiling, add the sugar to the cherries and let stand three hours before cooking. Then put them in a preserving kettle and boil and skim until the fruit is clear. Lift the cherries into jars and boil the syrup a little longer and pour over the fruit.

PRESERVED GAGE PLUMS

Use a pound of sugar to each pound of plums. Have the fruit clean and dry and prick all over with a needle to keep the skins from breaking. Melt the sugar with as little water as possible and when boiling add the plums, a layer at a time. Boil for a few minutes, lift out with a skimmer, and place singly on a dish to cool. Continue in this way until all the plums are done, then when the last layer is finished, return the first ones cooked to the kettle, boil until transparent. This time take out and arrange neatly in glass jars. Continue until each layer is finished. When all are done, pour the hot syrup over them. Seal up as usual.

QUINCE JELLY

To each pound of cut up quinces add a cup of water. Put in a kettle and stew until soft. Don't crush, put them in a jelly bag to drain. Add a pound of sugar to each pint of liquor. Let boil gently until sugar is dissolved then boil more quickly, pour into glasses and cover with paraffin when cold.

PRESERVED PEARS

Peel, half and remove core of Bartlett or Seckle pears, allow one pound of sugar to each pound of fruit. Put the sugar on to cook with a few spoonfuls of water. Stick a clove in each piece of fruit. Boil until thoroughly done. Put the fruit in glass jars, and cover with the syrup and seal. The juice and rind of one lemon to every five pounds of fruit can be used instead of cloves or both can be used.

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