Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 101 Part 2.djvu/529

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101 STAT. 1329-186
101 STAT. 1329-186
PUBLIC LAW 100-000—MMMM. DD, 1987

PUBLIC LAW 100-202—DEC. 22, 1987

101 STAT. 1329-186

(b) APPOINTMENT OF SPECIAL AMBASSADOR.—The President is au-

President of U.S.

thorized to appoint a special ambassadorial level envoy who shall be responsible for representing the United States in direct negotiations with the parties to the Cyprus dispute, for representing the United States in negotiations through international intermediaries and, generally, lending the good offices of the United States to the parties in this dispute in order to facilitate a peaceful settlement on Cyprus. As agreed to by Greece and Turkey, the special envoy shall also represent the United States in promoting mutual discussions between those countries concerning their differences on Aegean issues. The special ambassador appointed under this section shall have available the services of two deputies (one to specialize on the Cyprus question, the other on general Aegean issues) and such senior level Department of State personnel as may be required by the special ambassador in order to carry out his responsibilities. (c) REPORT.—Not later than June 1, 1988, the President shall President of U.S. submit a report to the Congress describing in detail the activities being undertaken by the special ambassador, the progress being made toward achievement of a peaceful resolution of the Cyprus dispute, an assessment of the obstacles to achievement of such a resolution and of the future role of the United States in acheiving a settlement on Cyprus, and an assessment of the progress being made toward resolution of issues affecting the Aegean region. (d) FUNDING.—Up to $500,000 of the funds appropriated under any heading of this Act which are allocated for Greece and up to $500,000 of the funds appropriated under any heading of this Act which are allocated for Turkey, may be used by the Department of State for any administrative costs associated with the activities of the special ambassador and supporting personnel, including transportation, salaries and per diem. DETENTION OF CHILDREN

"I

SEC. 587. It is the sense of the Congress that the practice of detaining children without charge or trial is unjust, inhumane, and is an affront to civilized principles. The Congress further believes that it should be the policy of the United States to make the ending of the practice of detaining children without charge or trial a matter of the highest priority. Therefore, the Congress believes the Secretary of State should convey to all international organizations that ending the practice of detaining children without charge or trial should be a policy of the highest priority for those organizations. TRAINING ASSISTANCE FOR ARGENTINA AND BRAZIL SEC.

588. (a) EXEMPTION FROM CERTAIN PROHIBITIONS.—Section

638 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 is amended— 22 USC 2398. (1) by inserting "(a)" before "No"; and (2) by adding at the end the following: "(b) No provision of this Act or any other provision of law shall be construed to prohibit assistance for any training activity which is funded under this Act for Brazil or Argentina as long as such country continues to have a democractically elected government and the assistance is otherwise consistent with sections 116, 502B, 620(0, 620A, and 660 of this Act.".