Open main menu

Page:Catholic Encyclopedia, volume 17.djvu/162

This page needs to be proofread.


CANADA


146


OAKADA


hands of the Christian Brothers, who opened a school under the name of St. John's College. After five years, St. John's College proved equally a fail- ure and was closed in 1876. The property was then purchased by Mr. John Lawler, and in 1880 pre- sented to the Jesuits, and that same year the Fathers of the Buffalo Mission opened the ^'Sacred Heart College" at Prairie du Chien. The opening year there were 61 students, of whom 25 were day scholars.

The first president was the Rev. William Becker, S.J., who had been the founder and first president of Canisius College, Buffalo. The faculty of the new college also numbered among its mem- bers the Rev. John Hagen, S. J., at present head of the Papal Observatonr at Rome. At the end of Father Becker's presidency the number had so in- creased that in 1884 a new building was added, and that same year saw the first classical graduates of the college. But in spite of this apparent success undergraduate classes were discontinued from 1888- 98 to allow the Jesuits to use the buildings for the higher studies of members of the order. In 1898 the college again opened its doors and in 1901 the Rev. Ulnch Beinzel, S.J., became president, to be succeeded in 1904 by the Rev. Joseph L. Spaeth, S. J. Another building was added to the rapidly growing college about this time, and again in 1910, after the Rev. Jos. M. Homing, S.J., had become president, another wing was added. Upon Father Homing's death in 1911, the Rev. George R. Kis- ter, S. J., succeeded him and presided over the col- lege until March, 1918, when the present head of the college, the Rev. Albert C. Fox became president.

In 1913 the corporate name of the school was changed to "Campion College of the Sacred Heart." The usual curriculum of all Jesuit colleges is fol- lowed: the faculty, members, 15, and the total en- rollment of students for 1920-21 is 101.

OaiiAda (cf. C. E., III-227b).— The area of Can- ada is 3,603,336 sq. miles of land and 126,329 sq. miles of water, a total of 3,729,665 square miles. The following table shows the population of the provinces in 1911 and 1921 (preliminary reports) :



1921


1911


Per Cent of Increase


New Brunswick.


388,092


351,092


1029


Nova Scotia .. .


524,579


492,338


6^


Prince Edward





Island


88,536


93.728


5.54 (decrease)


Alberta


581,995


374,663


55.34


Manitoba


613,008


461,630


32.79


British Colum-





bia


523,369


392,480


33.34


Quebec


2,349,067


2,005,776


17.11


Ontario


2,929,054


2,523,274


1725


Of the 1920 immigrants, 51 per cent came from the United Kingdom; 42 per cent from the United States and 7 oer cent from other countries. They were classified according to occupation as follows: farmers and laborers, 31,2S2; seneral laborers, 7,372; mechanics, 14,640; clerks, traders, etc., 3,^5; miners, 1,003; domestics, 6,069; not classified, 53,180. Of these the Maritime Provinces received 5,554; Que- bec, 13,078; Ontaria, 39,344; Manitoba, 11,387; Saskatchewan, 14,287; Alberta, 20,000; British Co- lumbia and Yukon Territory, 13,686; total, 117,336.

The number of Chinese entering Canada has been much reduced in recent years, owing to the opera- tion of the order, renewed every six months since December, 1913, imder which the landing in British Columbia of skilled and unskilled artisans and laborers is prohibited. In the fiscal year 1920 the number of Chinese who paid head tax was 363, as compared with 4,006 in 1919. In November, 1921, British Columbia petitioned the Dominion Gov- ernment to take measures for the exclusion of Asiatic immigration.

The Indian population ly provinces in 1917 was as follows: Prince Edward Island, 292; Nova Scotia, 2,031; New Brunswick, 1,846; Quebec, 13,366; On- taria, 26,411; Manitoba, 11,583; Saskatchewan, 10,- 646; Alberta, 8,837; British Columbia, 25,694; Yukon, 1,528; Northwest Territories, 3,764; toUl, 105,998. The Eskimos numbered 3,296. Of the total acreage of Indian reservations (4,860,675 acres) 2,143,708 acres were cleared but not cultivated, and 210,(K24 acres were cultivated; the value of the lands in 1919 was 51,535,245. puring 1919 crops to the value of 3,462,147 were raised by the Indians, the corresponding value for 1918 was $3,142,046. They owned 35,285 horses, 52,522 head of cattle, and 117,453 poultry, the total value of the live stock and poultry being 14,443,970. For Indian edu- cational purposes appropriations were made by Parliament for the year 1919-20, amounted to $1,- 057,663. There were 321 schools with 12,196 pupUs. The religious census of the Indians 31 March, 1917, is given as follows: Anglican, 20,183; Presbyterian, 2,155; Methodist, 12^20; Catholic, 43,986: Baptist, 1,297; other Christian beliefs, 1,426; abonginal he^ Uefs, 8,414.

Agricultxtre^ — ^The total value of the annual farm production of Canada in 1920 was $1,455,244,650. The production of wheat was 263,189,300 bushels from 18,232,374 acres, an aversige of 14.5 bushels per acre. The following list of exports reveals the extent of Canadian commerce:


The largest cities with their population are : Mon- treal, 607,063; Toronto, 293,571; Winnipeg, 178,364; Vancouver, 116,700; Ottawa, 107,137; Hamilton, 81,969 (1911); Quebec, 94,058; Halifax, 57,674; Cal- gary, 63,117; Victoria, 38,682; Edmonton, 58,627.

Immigration slackened between 1914 and 1920, as the following figures attest*


Total exportation...

Field products.

Animals and animal

products

Cheese

Forest products

Mineral products. . .

Manufactures

Fisheries


1918


$1,580,100,792 577,760,350

179,808.188 30,277,359 51,900,349 75,088.875

000.840,430 33,221,175


1919


$1,208,705,285 292,557;i83

207,285,492 35,223,983 70,590,199 80,707,211

571,408,078 37,809,394


1920


$1,288,058,709 808.797,221

200,037,489 30.330.803

105.540,780 02.821.003

435.121.980 42.540.079



United


United


Other


vn A. 1



Kingdom


States


Countries


Total


1914


142,622


107,530


134,726


384,878


1915


43,276


59,779


41,734


144,789


1916


8.664


36,937


2,936


48,537


1917


8,282


61,389


5.703


75,374


1918


3,178


71,314


4,582


79.074


1919


9,914


40,715


7,073


57,702


1920


59,603


49,656


8,077


117,336


Forestry. — Statistics of the lumber industry in 1917 reveal a capital of $149,266,019; employees on salaries, 3,159; payment of salaries, 14,781,300; em- ployees on wages, 53,318; wages, $34,412,411; cost of materials, $58,403,316; value of products, $68^15,472.

In 1919 the income from the lumber industry was estimated at $122,359,748, distributed as follows: Ontario, $33,671,334; British Columbia, $32,540,244; Quebec, $30,195,646; New Brunswick, $16,477,477; Nova Scotia, $6,262,745; Saskatchewan, $1,326,668; Manitoba, $937,679; Alberta, $696,518; Prince Ed- ward Island, $238,687; Yukon, $12,680.