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The Works of the Rev. Jonathan Swift/Volume 13/From Jonathan Swift to Michael Clancy - 1

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SIR,
CHRISTMAS DAY, 1737.
 


SOME friend of mine lent me a comedy[1], which I am told was written by you: I read it carefully, with much pleasure, on account both of the characters and the moral. I have no interest with the people of the playhouse, else I should gladly recommend it to them. I send you a small present[2], in such gold as will not give you trouble to change; for I much pity your loss of sight[3], which if it pleased God to let you enjoy, your other talents might have been your honest support, and have eased you of your present confinement. I am, sir, your well wishing friend and humble servant,


I know not who lent me the play; if it came from you, I will send it back to morrow.


  1. The Sharper, the principal character of which performance was designed to represent colonel Chartres.
  2. This packet contained five pounds in small pieces of gold of different kinds, of which the largest did not exceed the value of five shillings. A little time after (says Dr. Clancy) I sent him a parcel of tickets: he kept but one, which he said he had paid for, and afterward sent me two four pound pieces for more. See Clancy's Memoirs, vol. II, page 56.
  3. Dr. Clancy had pursued the study of physick, and was patronised by Dr. Helsham; but having lost his sight by a cold in 1737, before he could regularly engage in the business of his profession, he kept a Latin school for his support.
  4. This letter and the packet were sealed with the head of Socrates.