Open main menu

Sikhim and Bhutan.djvu

Pages   (key to Page Status)   

 i  ii  iii  iv  v  vi  vii  viii  ix  x  xi  xii  xiii  xiv  xv  xvi  xvii  xviii  xix 001 002 003 004 img 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 img 023 024 025 026 027 028 img 029 030 031 032 033 034 img 035 036 037 038 img 039 040 041 042 img 043 044 045 046 047 048 img 049 050 051 052 053 054 055 056 057 058 img 059 060 img 061 062 063 064 img 065 066 img 067 068 img 069 070 img 071 072 img 073 074 075 076 077 078 079 080 img 081 082 083 084 085 086 img 087 088 089 090 img 091 092 img 093 094 095 096 097 098 099 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 img 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 img 123 124 125 126 img 127 128 img 129 130 img 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 img 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 img 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 img 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 img 199 200 201 202 img 203 204 205 206 img 207 208 209 210 211 212 img 213 214 img 215 216 217 218 img 219 220 221 222 img 223 224 225 226 img 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 img 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 img 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 img 295 296 img 297 298 img 299 300 img img 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 img 327 328 329 330 331 332 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 326

Full OCR text is available at: https://archive.org/stream/in.ernet.dli.2015.279230/2015.279230.Sikhim-And_djvu.txt

The text of p. 326 is missing from the scans of this book. A scan has been obtained from elsewhere and appears at the end of the pagelist.

There are two maps in this book. The first one appears between pp. 300-301. It appears to be unique to this copy of the book, and doesn't appear in the list of illustrations. The second map appears at the end of the book (but before the index). It appears in the list of illustrations.

CONTENTS

CHAP. PAGE.
I.  THE GEOGRAPHICAL POSITION AND GENERAL FEATURES OF THE STATES OF SIKHIM AND BHUTAN 1
II.  THE PEOPLE: THEIR MORALS, RELIGION, AND LANGUAGE 7
III.  A SHORT HISTORY OF SIKHIM 16
IV.  EARLY REMINISCENCES

First visit to Sikhim, 1887. The brothers Khangsa Dewan and Phodong Lama, the Shoe Dewan and Kazis. Return to Gangtak with the Entchi Column, 1888. First meeting with Their Highnesses the Maharaja and Maharani of Sikhim

19
V.  MORE EARLY REMINISCENCES

My appointment to Sikhim. Departure of the Maharaja to Kurseong. Inspection of the country with Phodong Lama and Shoe Dewan. Opening up by means of roads and bridges. Sources of revenue. Mineral wealth. Visit to Yatung, so-called Trade Mart

25
VI.  MORE EARLY REMINISCENCES

Building a house. Lepcha servants. Supplies. A garden party. The Residency garden. Roses and lilies. A wave of colour. Orchids. Visit to Tumlong. Worship of Kangchenjunga. Lama dance. Missionaries. Difficulties of travelling. Crossing the Teesta in flood. Landslips. Leeches

33
VII.  THE DELHI DURBAR AND VISIT OF THE CHIEFS TO CALCUTTA TO MEET THEIR ROYAL HIGHNESSES THE PRINCE AND PRINCESS OF WALES 45
VIII.  EXPEDITIONS AND EXPLORATIONS IN SIKHIM

From Gangtak over the Giucha-la to Ringen. Loss of a coolie. Camp amongst glaciers and moraines. A snow leopard. Alpine flowers. Avalanches and ice caves. Crossing a difficult gorge. Lepchas and wild bees. The Rungnu. Sakhyong

53
IX.  EXPEDITIONS AND EXPLORATIONS IN SIKHIM—continued

From Gangtak to the Zemu glacier, Lonak Valley, Lachen and Lachung. Mr. Hoffmann. Cloud effects. Cane bridges. Hot springs. Talung Monastery and its treasures. Grazing land and Tibetan herdsmen. Yak transport. Locusts. The Sebu Pass. Snow-blindness. Lachung. Goral-shooting

63
X.  EXPEDITIONS AND EXPLORATIONS IN SIKHIM—continued

Demarcation of the northern boundary between Sikhim and Tibet. Difficulties of transport. Mountain sickness. Survey work. Caught in a storm. Durkey Sirdar. Ovis ammon. Photographing the glaciers. A ride at 21,600 feet. Evidence of former size of the glaciers

82
XI.  DEPARTURE FROM SIKHIM 94
XII.  HISTORY OF THE FOUNDING OF BHUTAN 99
XIII.  MY FIRST MISSION TO BHUTAN

From Gangtak to Tashi-cho-jong. Choice of routes. The Natu-la in bad weather. Deputation in the Chumbi Valley. Entering Bhutan. The Hah-la and Meru-la. Punishment for murder. Leather cannon. Paro. The Penlop’s wives. Paro-jong. Turner’s description. Eden’s description. Dug-gye. Weeping cypress at Chalimaphe. The quarrel between Ugyen Wang-chuk and Aloo Dorji. Murder of Poonakha Jongpen. Tashi-cho-jong

105
XIV.  MY FIRST MISSION TO BHUTAN—continued

From Tashi-cho-jong to Tongsa-jong. Simtoka-jong. Entry into Poonakha. The Deb Raja. Presentation of K.C.I.E. Description of Poonakha Fort. Expedition to Norbugang and Talo Monasteries. Visit of the Tango Lama. So-na-ga-sa the Zemri-gatchie of Turner. Farewell visit to the Deb. Angdu-phodang. Death of my dog Nari. The Pele-la. Tongsa-jong. Bad roads. Water-power prayer-wheels. The ceremony of blessing the rice-fields

137
XV.  MY FIRST MISSION TO BHUTAN—continued

From Tongsa-jong to Bya-gha, Lingzi, and Phari. Hospitality of the Tongsa and Tongsa’s sister at Bya-gha. Old monasteries near Bya-gha. Ancient traditions. Carvers and carpenters at the Champa Lhakhang Monastery. Regret at leaving Bya-gha. Lama dances. Farewell to Sir Ugyen. Reception at Tashi-cho-jong. Last interview with the Deb Raja. Ta-tshang lamas. Cheri Monastery. Magnificent scenery. Incorrect maps. Exposure of the dead to lammergeiers. View of Tibet from the Ling-shi Pass. Break-up of the Mission

161
XVI.  AN EXPLORATION OF EASTERN BHUTAN AND A PORTION OF TIBET IN 1906

From Gangtak viâ Dewangiri to Tashigong and Tashi-yangtsi, and on to Tsekang. Horse-flies. Dorunga. Cypripedium Fairianum. Sudden rise of the river. Tigers near the camp. Chungkhar. Borshang iron-mines. Tashigong. Stick lac cultivation. Suspension bridges. Source of the Dongma-chhu. Tashi-yangtsi. Prayer-wheels. Old roads. Chorten Kara. New flowering trees

184
XVII.  AN EXPLORATION OF EASTERN BHUTAN AND A PORTION OF TIBET IN 1906—continued

From Tsekang to Lhakhang-jong. Lhalung Monastery and Pho-mo-chang-thang Lake to Gyantse. Crossing the Bod-la between Bhutan and Tibet. Riding yaks. Welcome in Tibet. Meeting with Sir Ugyen. Wild gooseberries. Old gold-workings. Friendliness of Tibetans. Lhakhang-jong. Tuwa-jong. Dekila, widow of Norbu Sring. Lhalung Monastery. Ovis ammon. Source of the Nyeru-chhu

197
XVIII.  MY SECOND MISSION TO BHUTAN

Severe weather. Shau. A frozen torrent. Dug-gye-jong. A visit to Paro Ta-tshang Monastery. Sang-tog-peri. Paro-jong burnt down. Arrival at Poonakha. The Tongsa’s band

211
XIX.  MY SECOND MISSION TO BHUTAN—continued

Installation of Sir Ugyen as Maharaja of Bhutan. Presentation of gifts. Tea ceremony. Oath of allegiance. Seal of the Dharma Raja. Chinese influence on the frontier. Christmas Day. Feeding the poor. Return of escort. Discussion of State affairs with Maharaja and council. I leave for Jaigaon. A Takin. Inspection of frontier. Wild animals

224
XX.  BRITISH MISSIONS TO BHUTAN

Bogle, 1774. Hamilton, 1775 and 1777. Turner, 1783. Pemberton, 1838. Eden, 1864. White, 1905. White, 1907

237
XXI.  BRITISH RELATIONS WITH BHUTAN FROM 1772

Nepalese invasion of Tibet, 1792. The Athara Duars. Friction with Bhutan. Our occupation of the Bengal Duars. Expedition against Bhutan. Loss of guns. Treaty of Rawa Pani. Whole of Duars taken by us. Tongsa Penlop accompanies expedition to Lhasa. Sir Ugyen’s visit to Calcutta. Sir Ugyen elected Maharaja

264
XXII.  FOREIGN RELATIONS WITH BHUTAN

China. Tibet. Nepal. Sikhim. Cooch Behar

285
XXIII.  ARTS AND INDUSTRIES OF SIKHIM AND BHUTAN

Chinese and Indian influence. Metal-work in Sikhim. Method of casting. Sikhim knives. Aniline dyes. Weaving school in Lachung. Carpet factory in Gangtak. Apple orchards in Lachung and Chumbi. Cheese and butter making. Bhutan metal-work. A wonderful pan-box. Beaten copper and silver work. Bells. Swords and daggers. Weaving. Needlework pictures. Basket-work. Influence of the feudal system. Inferiority of Tibetan work. Wood-carving in Sikhim, Bhutan, and Nepal

294
APPENDICES
I.  THE LAWS OF BHUTAN 301
II.  THE LAWS OF SIKHIM AND MARRIAGE CUSTOMS 311
III.  A LIST OF SOME OF THE PRINCIPAL ANIMALS AND BIRDS TO BE FOUND IN THESE COUNTRIES, AND THEIR HABITAT 322
IV.  DESCRIPTIONS OF THE ART SPECIMENS ILLUSTRATED IN CHAPTER XXIII. 325
INDEX 327