Index:The Natural History of Pliny.djvu

The Natural History of Pliny.djvu

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CONTENTS.
OF THE FIRST VOLUME.

BOOK I.
DEDICATION. Page
C. Plinius Secundus to his friend Titus Vespasian 1
BOOK II.
AN ACCOUNT OF THE WORLD AND THE ELEMENTS.
Chap.
1. Whether the world be finite, and whether there be more than one world 13
2. Of the form of the world 16
3. Of its nature; whence the name is derived ib.
4. Of the elements and the planets 18
5. Of God 20
6. Of the nature of the stars; of the motion of the planets 25
7. Of the eclipses of the moon and the sun 34
8. Of the magnitude of the stars 35
9. An account of the observations that have been made on the heavens by different individuals 36
10. On the recurrence of the eclipses of the sun and the moon 38
11. Of the motion of the moon 40
12. Of the motions of the planets and the general laws of their aspects ib.
13. Why the same stars appear at some times more lofty and at other times more near 42
14. Why the same stars have different motions 47
15. General laws of the planets 48
16. The reason why the stars are of different colours 49
17. Of the motion of the sun and the cause of the irregularity of the days 50
18. Why thunder is ascribed to Jupiter 51
19. Of the distances of the stars 52
20. Of the harmony of the stars ib.
21. Of the dimensions of the world 53
22. Of the stars which appear suddenly, or of comets 55
23. Their nature, situation, and species 66
24. The doctrine of Hipparchus about the stars 59
25. Examples from history of celestial prodigies; Faces, Lampades, and Bolides ib.
26. Trabes Cælestes; Chasma Cœli 60
27. Of the colours of the sky and of celestial flame ib.
28. Of celestial coronæ 61
29. Of sudden circles 62
30. Of unusually long eclipses of the sun ib.
31. Many suns ib.
32. Many moons 63
33. Daylight in the night ib.
34. Burning shields ib.
35. An ominous appearance in the heavens, that was seen once only ib.
36. Of stars which move about in various directions 64
37. Of the stars which are named Castor and Pollux ib.
38. Of the air, and on the cause of the showers of stones 65
39. Of the stated seasons 66
40. Of the rising of the dog-star 67
41. Of the regular influence of the different seasons ib.
42. Of uncertain states of the weather 69
43. Of thunder and lightning ib.
44. The origin of winds 70
45. Various observations respecting winds 71
46. The different kinds of winds 73
47. The periods of the winds 75
48. Nature of the winds 77
49. Ecnephias and Typhon 79
50. Tornadoes; blasting winds; whirlwinds, and other wonderful kinds of tempests 80
51. Of thunder; in what countries it does not fall, and for what reason ib.
52. Of the different kinds of lightning and their wonderful effects 81
53. The Etrurian and the Roman observations on these points 82
54. Of conjuring up thunder 83
55. General laws of lightning 84
56. Objects which are never struck 86
57. Showers of milk, blood, flesh, iron, wool, and baked tiles 87
58. Rattling of arms and the sound of trumpets heard in the sky 88
59. Of stones that have fallen from the clouds The opinion of Anaxagoras respecting them ib.
60. The rainbow 89
61. The nature of hail, snow, hoar, mist, dew; the forms of clouds 90
62. The peculiarities of the weather in different places 91
63. Nature of the earth ib.
64. Of the form of the earth 94
65. Whether there be antipodes? ib.
66. How the water is connected with the earth. Of the navigation of the sea and the rivers 97
67. Whether the ocean surrounds the earth 98
68. What part of the earth is inhabited 100
69. That the earth is in the middle of the world 102
70. Of the obliquity of the zones ib.
71. Of the inequality of climates ib.
72. In what places eclipses are invisible, and why this is the case 104
73. What regulates the daylight on the earth 105
74. Remarks on dials, as connected with this subject 106
75. When and where there are no shadows 107
76. Where this takes place twice in the year and where the shadows fall in opposite directions 108
77. Where the days are the longest and where the shortest ib.
78. Of the first dial 109
79. Of the mode in which the days a are computed 110
80. Of the difference of nations as depending on the nature of the world ib.
81. Of earthquakes 111
82. Of clefts of the earth 112
83. Signs of an approaching earthquake 114
84. Preservatives against future earthquakes ib.
85. Prodigies of the earth which have occurred once only 115
86. Wonderful circumstances attending earthquakes 116
87. In what places the sea has receded ib.
88. The mode in which islands rise up 117
89. What islands have been formed, and at what periods 118
90. Lands which have been separated by the sea 119
91. Islands which have been united to the main land ib.
92. Lands which have been totally changed into seas ib.
93. Lands which have been swallowed up 120
94. Cities which have been absorbed by the sea ib.
95. Of vents in the earth 121
96. Of certain lands which are always shaking, and of floating islands 122
97. Places in which it never rains 123
98. The wonders of various countries collected together ib.
99. Concerning the cause of the flowing and ebbing of the sea 124
100. Where the tides rise and fall in an unusual manner 127
101. Wonders of the sea 128
102. The power of the moon over-the land and the sea ib.
103. The power of the sun 129
104. Why the sea is salt ib.
105. Where the sea is the deepest 130
106. The wonders of fountains and rivers 131
107. The wonders of fire and water united 138
108. Of Maltha 138
109. Of naphtha 139
110. Places which are always burning ib.
111. Wonders of fire alone 141
112. The dimensions of the earth 143
113. The harmonical proportion of the universe 147
BOOK III.
AN ACCOUNT OF COUNTRIES, NATIONS, SEAS, TOWNS, HAVENS, MOUNTAINS, RIVERS, DISTANCES, AND PEOPLES WHO NOW EXIST OR FORMERLY EXISTED.
Chap. Page
Introduction 151
1. The boundaries and gulfs of Europe first set forth in a general way 153
2. Of Spain generally bi.
3. Of Bætica 154
4. Of Nearer Spain 164
5. Of the province of Gallia Narbonensis 174
6. Of Italy 180
7. Of the ninth region of Italy 184
8. The seventh region of Italy 186
9. The first region of Italy; the Tiber; Rome 191
10. The third region of Italy 207
11. Sixty-four islands, among which are the Baleares 210
12. Corsica 213
13. Sardinia 215
14. Sicily 216
15. Magna Græcia, beginning at Locri 222
16. The second region of Italy 225
17. The fourth region of Italy 231
18. The fifth region of Italy 235
19. The sixth region of Italy 237
20. The eighth region of Italy; the Padus 241
21. The eleventh region of Italy; Italia Transpadana 246
22. The tenth region of Italy 248
23. Istria, its people and locality 251
24. The Alps, and the Alpine nations 254
25. Liburnia and Illyricum 257
26. Dalmatia 259
27. The Norici 262
28. Pannonia 263
29. Mœsia 264
30. Islands of the Ionian Sea and the Adriatic 265
BOOK IV.
AN ACCOUNT OF COUNTRIES, NATIONS, SEAS, TOWNS, HAVENS, MOUNTAINS, RIVERS, DISTANCES, AND PEOPLES WHO NOW EXIST OR FORMERLY EXISTED.
1. Epirus 271
2. Acarnania 273
3. Ætolia 275
4. Locris and Phocis 276
5. The Peloponnesus 278
6. Achaia 280
7. Messenia 282
8. Laconia 283
9. Argolis 284
10. Arcadia 285
11. Attica 288
12. Bœtia 290
13. Doris 293
14. Phthiotis 293
15. Thessaly Proper 294
16. Magnesia 296
17. Macedonia 297
18. Thrace; the Ægean Sea 302
19. The islands which lie before the lands already mentioned 310
20. Crete 313
21. Eubœa 316
22. The Cyclades 317
23. The Sporades 320
24. The Hellespont. — The lake Mæotis 326
25. Dacia, Sarmatia 329
26. Scythia 330
27. The islands of the Euxine. he islands of the northern ocean 338
28. Germany 345
29. Ninety-six islands of the Gallic ocean 349
30. Britannia 350
31. Gallia Belgica 353
32. Gallia Lugdunensis 355
33. Gallia Aquitanica 357
34. Nearer Spain, its coast along the Gallic ocean 360
35. Lusitania 363
36. The islands in the Atlantic ocean 367
37. The general measurement of Europe 369
BOOK V.
AN ACCOUNT OF COUNTRIES, NATIONS, SEAS, TOWNS, HAVENS, MOUNTAINS, RIVERS, DISTANCES, AND PEOPLES WHO NOW EXIST OR FORMERLY EXISTED.
1. The two Mauritanias 374
2. Numidia 387
3. Africa 388
4. The Syrtes 391
5. Cyrenaica 395
6. Libya Marcotis 401
7. The islands in the vicinity of Africa 402
8. Countries on the other side of Africa 403
9. Egypt and Thebais 406
10. The River Nile 410
11. The cities of Egypt 416
12. The coasts of Arabia, situate on the Egyptian Sea 422
13. Syria 423
14. Idumæa, Palæstina, and Samaria 424
15. Judaea 427
16. Decapolis 431
17. Phœnice 433
18. Syria Antiochia 436
19. The remaining parts of Syria 438
20. The Euphrates 441
21. Syria upon the Euphrates 443
22. Cilicia and the adjoining nations 446
23. Isauria and the Homonades 450
24. Pisidia 451
25. Lycaonia ib.
26. Pamphylia 452
27. Mount Taurus 453
28. Lycia 455
29. Caria 458
30. Lydia 465
31. Ionia 466
32. Æolis 472
33. Troas and the adjoining nations 476
34. The islands which lie in front of Asia 479
35. Cyprus 480
36. Rhodes 483
37. Samos 485
38. Chios 486
39. Lesbos 487
40. The Hellespont and Mysia 488
41. Phrygia 490
42. Galatia and the adjoining nations 491
43. Bithynia 493
44. The islands of the Propontis 496